Prenatal exposure to vanadium (a steel additive) associated with adverse birth outcomes: cohort study

A two-year population-based cohort study done in three cities in Hubei, China concluded that pregnant women who were exposed to vanadium were at an increased risk of delivering babies who were of low birth weight. The gestation period for these high-risk babies was likewise shortened, with exposed babies typically being delivered before nine months.

  • Nearly 8,000 pregnant Chinese women were recruited between September 2012 and October 2014.
  • Vanadium was measured through the women’s urine samples.
  • Vanadium is a trace element typically alloyed with iron ore. The metal is used as a shock- and corrosion-resistant steel additive.
  • Previous studies have shown that vanadium can cause lung and gastrointestinal problems among workers exposed to the metal.
  • For the study, algorithms and multiple logistic regressions were used to adjust for potential confounders.
  • Correlations were analyzed between the presence of vanadium in the body and the possibility of late pre-term delivery, early-term delivery, low birthrate, and being small for gestational age.

It was found that prenatal exposure to vanadium made it more likely for babies to be born earlier than expected. These babies were also smaller for their age. The authors of the study have recommended for further research to be conducted. 

Journal Reference

Hu, J. et. al. ASSOCIATION OF ADVERSE BIRTH OUTCOMES WITH PRENATAL EXPOSURE TO VANADIUM: A POPULATION-BASED COHORT STUDY. The Lancet Planetary Health; 2017, 1:6 DOI: 10.1016/S2542-5196(17)30094-3

Comments
comments powered by Disqus

RECENT NEWS & ARTICLES